How can I replace a lost birth certificate?

Personal Finance December 08, 2013|Print

In your state: To replace a birth certificate for a person who was born or died in your state, find out where state and county Vital Records are kept, or access Vital Records vitalrec.com/ on the Internet, and click on your state. Often such records are found in the state department of health. In some states these records are available electronically. You will likely have to pay a fee to get a certified copy of a birth certificate. Information required usually includes name on the record, date of birth, place of birth (city or county), father’s name, and mother’s name (including maiden name).

In another state: For birth records outside of your state, an official certificate should be on file in that state. These certificates are typically prepared by physicians or hospital authorities and are permanently filed in the central vital statistics office of the state, city, or outlying area where the event occurred. The federal government does not maintain files of such records. To obtain a certified copy of a birth or death certificate from another state, order online at www.vitalrec.com/usmap.html. Click on the state where the person was born, married, or died and follow the directions for ordering the document needed.

Outside the United States: As of December 31, 2010 the Department of State no longer issues Certificates of Report of Birth (DS-1350). All previously issued DS-1350s are still valid as proof of identity, citizenship and for other legal purposes. On January 3, 2011, the Department of State began issuing a new Consular Report of Birth Abroad (FS-240). You may request multiple copies of this document at any time. There is a cost for both the DS-1350 and FS-240 applications; send a check or money order for $50 payable to the U.S. Department of State. This address is also used to obtain a “Report of the Death of an American Citizen.” Department of State Passport Services Vital Records Section Room 510 1111 19th Street, NW Washington, DC 20036

For more infrmation, see http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/w2w.htm.

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