How can I get rid of the ice on the windows of my home?

Home Energy July 08, 2010|Print
Ice on house windows is a result of two things: the temperature of the window, and the humidity level in the home. The temperature of the window is a result of the window type, any interior window treatments, and the outside temperature. The indoor humidity is a function of the internal moisture sources and home air exchange rate. For a given outdoor temperature, you must either increase the window temperature by improving the insulating value of the window, or improving air circulation to the window surface (e.g. opening draperies during the day and letting air flow across the window). The more likely solution is to reduce the indoor humidity. This can be done by reducing interior moisture production and water leaks, or by increasing the ventilation in the home (e.g. using bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans and making sure the clothes dryer is vented to the outside) in the home. In tight homes that burn fuels such as natural gas or propane, a precaution is that these exhaust fans might increase the negative pressure in the home and could contribute to combustion safety concerns. It might be advisable to consult a home performance contractor. Increasing the insulation value of a window may involve adding a storm window, or installing a more efficient window and good air sealing. Lower cost solutions include buying used storm windows that fit, or using plastic over the interior windows. Note: For homes that use gas as a energy source, ice/moisture on the interior of windows could be an indication of appliance combustion gases including of carbon monoxide. This should be immediately checked out by a qualified heating contractor. For more information, see the eXtension web site to find Local Extension offices near you.

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